Journeys are recorded here. They are the travels of others,  journeys on my own and with chums.  Imaginary tours and flights of fancy. Here we have a rabbit which scampered across my path in June 2017.To me he was every bit the busy commuter going to a very important meeting indeed.  He was too fast for me to shoot him (on my camera) so I sketched him.

 Gray Rabbit is in a hurry

Gray Rabbit is in a hurry

 

 

THE TAMAR PANTONE PROJECT

 

I have developed the habit of recording the most interesting colour in the river each time I cross the Tamar.  I make a note of the event and conditions and find the nearest Pantone colour to it.  After I have learnt to calibrate the Pantone colours on my computer correctly I would like to produce a work that looks like a Farrow and Ball Colour Chart. This work was inspired by K P Bremer’s series of works called Himmelfarben [Skycolours] which he produced in 1969 and 1976.  The notes from the Venice Biennale catalogue gives the following reading of the work: there are a series of charts representing the colour of the sky as assessed by the artist at hourly interval over the course of the day which, form a diary of sorts tinged with pathos.  The eyes of the poet, Brehmer seems to suggest, have been replaced by the Meteorologist.   When I saw the work at the 2013 Venice Biennale my reading was a delight at the elegant simplicity of the materials used and a profound respect for the mindful, repeated act of constantly looking.

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I think I might be saying that colour can be perceived at a very basic level as commodity but none the less the act of undertaking a regular journey is not in itself dull as each iteration will yield a different colour pallet, events and thought trails. The crossing of the river Tamar on the journey from Bodmin to Plymouth remains a highlight and it is satisfying to look carefully, record and remember K P Bremer.  I often remember that Plato in Cratylus, 402a alludes to Heraclitus when he states You never walk into the same river twice.

 

 Transcribed Diary Entry.

Transcribed Diary Entry.

As I make the crossing by Great Western  trains, using the Brunel Bridge high above the river, I remember the Tay Bridge disaster in 1879 so, I hope never to walk in the river at all. I then remember The Tay Bridge Disaster is a poem written in 1880 by the Scottish poet William McGonagall, who has been widely 'acclaimed' as the worst poet in history. The poem recounts the events of the evening of December 28, 1879, when, during a severe gale, the Tay Rail Bridge at Dundee collapsed as a train was passing over it with the loss of all on board. Look the poem up on the internet -  the poem is a cultural disaster of the highest magnitude.